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Oliver Kahn:

We’re not making enough of our superiority

The top of the table showdown with Werder Bremen began with a shock for Oliver Kahn when Diego put the visitors into a sixth-minute lead. After that, the Bayern captain cajoled and urged his men forward, a model of resolve and determination as always, thus making a decisive contribution to the 1-1 final score. fcbayern.de summarises Kahn’s post-match statements.

Question: What’s your take on the 1-1 draw with Werder Bremen?
Kahn: “I do have the feeling the result flatters Bremen. We did very well in overcoming our setbacks in the first half. We fell behind, we were unlucky with offsides, we missed a penalty, we showed great character and made it 1-1. Bremen weren’t in it in the second half, but we were totally dominant by the end. And that’s our problem, we’re making too little of our superiority.“

Question: What does the result mean for the title race?
Kahn: “We’ll have to wait and see. We’re three points ahead of Bremen, and five ahead of the team in third. It’s in our own hands, we simply have to capitalise on the dominance we achieve in almost every match and score more goals. If we do, we’ll take the title comfortably.“

Question: Was the absence of Franck Ribéry the main reason you couldn’t turn territorial superiority into goals?
Kahn: “We have enough creative players capable of delivering the decisive pass, or providing moments which turn a match. But you don’t have the feeling we’re likely to score from a free-kick or corner, the way you might expect us to turn a tight game like that in our favour. That’s the problem, we play neat football, it’s one-way traffic, but we don’t make enough of it.“

Question: You ran from goal to celebrate after the first-half equaliser, but why were you booked?
Kahn: “It was probably worth a yellow card, yes. Football is an emotional game, and one of the emotions is aggression. I wouldn’t want to see that eliminated from the game. Players pull off a jersey and get banned, someone runs from his goal and gets a yellow, what’s that about? Do we just want to watch meek little lambs, doing their job but devoid of emotion? We ought to consider whether certain yellow cards are really justified.“

Question: Who will supply the emotional impulse after you hang up your gloves at the end of the season?
Kahn: “Every team needs a player like Mark van Bommel or me, someone whose body language makes it clear what the situation is, what has to happen next out on the field, adding a touch of aggression. Players who aren’t afraid to do the dirty work. That’s important, but if we keep seeing yellow cards for every minor incident, you’re obviously going to be more and more reticent.“