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'Jürgen has done a very good job so far'

Bayern chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge is thoroughly satisfied with the first three and a half weeks of the Klinsmann era at the club. "The board thinks Jürgen has done a very good job up to now. Our partnership with him is perfect and very harmonious,“ the former world-class striker told reporters at a media round table. summarises the key points of Rummenigge's wide-ranging exchange with the press.

Karl-Heinz Rummenigge on…

…the first few weeks with Jürgen Klinsmann: "The board thinks Jürgen has done a very good job up to now. Our partnership with him is perfect and very harmonious. Uli Hoeneß and I regularly take lunch in the performance centre, so we're talking directly to Jürgen and the team. We also meet at least once a week in my office to talk through any ongoing business and take decisions. However, we all know that what happens on the field in the next few weeks will be critical.“

…the "new" Bayern: "We very much wanted to introduce the new culture Jürgen Klinsmann has brought to Bayern. It was on our wish list, otherwise we wouldn't have done it. The performance centre was Jürgen's idea. He approached us in the spring to request a few changes. Our investment has definitely paid off.“

…the club captaincy: "Jürgen is watching the individuals closely at the moment and will make an appointment before the Bundesliga restart. The new captain needs certain key qualities. He also needs to be pretty much fluent in German, because he has a lot of communicating to do. It's not an easy call for Jürgen, but I'm sure he'll find the right man.“

…whether three strikers are enough for the new season: "We believe so. We also have Thomas Müller, a young lad from the youth section, who's surprised us very positively with the way he's played in the friendlies so far. He can help the seniors in an emergency, but otherwise he'll pick up match practice in the reserves. We think he can make it here at the club. We have a two-pronged strategy: bringing on our own youngsters, and bringing in an occasional superstar.“

…Bayern's transfer plans: "We're not planning anything else for this summer. We contemplated bringing Alexander Hleb to Munich, but only if another player had chosen to leave us. That didn't happen, so the chapter marked Hleb is closed. I'm also assuming Mario Gomez won't become available. We do know he has a get-out clause in his contract which may allow us to sign him in the future.“

…the problem of releasing players for the Olympics: "I specifically raised this subject with FIFA President Joseph Blatter and General Secretary Jérôme Valcke back in March. The outcome was clear-cut: The Olympic tournament is not on the official FIFA calendar, so there is no obligation to release players. Bremen and Schalke don't want to release players, and I understand where they're coming from. I'm in favour of calling in the international sports arbitration court CAS for a one-off decision in this case. We're all desperate for legal certainty, which we think we have, but which apparently hasn't been clearly enough stated by FIFA. We took the heat out of it at Bayern nice and early. We asked Lucio and Demichelis to contact their national coaches and inform them we were basically unwilling to release them, but we also made contact with the Brazilian and Argentine associations ourselves and made a deal. We said we wouldn't release Lucio and Demichelis, but we would release Breno and Sosa. The associations accepted the deal.“

…collective marketing for the Bundesliga: "The monopolies and competition authorities have cast the whole future of collective central marketing in doubt. We hope the authorities relax their hard line and give the League a chance of survival via collective marketing. Bayern have always supported centralised marketing provided we're treated fairly. I don't see any signs that the DFL [German Football League] won't continue to do that in the future, so we have no plans to quit the centralised arrangement. However, we at Bayern have occasionally asked the DFL: Quo vadis Bundesliga? Is the DFL satisfied with the Bundesliga being a very good regional championship, or will it guarantee that the clubs have a chance in Europe? The DFL has yet to have this debate, and I hope it'll be held at some point. The DFL is not merely there to ensure we have a viable second division, but also to ensure the best Bundesliga clubs are competitive in the Champions League. The TV revenues in Spain, Italy and to a certain extent in England mean that's not guaranteed at present.“

…foreign investment in the Bundesliga: "The problem is that it's allowed in England and Italy. I think that if a Bundesliga club feels this kind of investment could be advantageous, we shouldn't slam the door shut, we should debate the conditions under which it would be acceptable. We're waiting for a final decision from the DFL. I hope the DFL states a clear position before Christmas. Bayern has no intention of doing anything like that. In any case, the club statutes stipulate that 50 percent plus one of the shares in the AG [joint stock company] must remain with the e.V. [members' club].“